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Côte de Nuits wine

Côte de Nuits

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Côte de Nuits wine

Côte de Nuits

About

The Côte de Nuits forms the northern half of the Côte d’Or, running from the outskirts of Dijon, through seven famous communes, to the villages of Prémeaux and Corgoloin, south of Nuits-Saint-Georges.


The region is around 20 kilometres long and between 200 and 800 metres wide. It covers 3,600 hectares. Driving south from Dijon, looking to the right, you will see slopes adorned with vineyards, broken up periodically by barren, rocky outcrops and, at its southern end, limestone quarries.

The Côte de Nuits, with few exceptions, is red wine country. It is, quite simply, home to some of the greatest Pinot Noirs in the world.

Contact us to place your order: [email protected] | +852 3694 3333

 

 

Watch Guy Seddon, Buyer, sharing some insights on the 2019 vintage.

The Côte de Nuits forms the northern half of the Côte d’Or, running from the outskirts of Dijon, through seven famous communes, to the villages of Prémeaux and Corgoloin, south of Nuits-Saint-Georges.


The region is around 20 kilometres long and between 200 and 800 metres wide. It covers 3,600 hectares. Driving south from Dijon, looking to the right, you will see slopes adorned with vineyards, broken up periodically by barren, rocky outcrops and, at its southern end, limestone quarries.

The Côte de Nuits, with few exceptions, is red wine country. It is, quite simply, home to some of the greatest Pinot Noirs in the world.

The Côte de Nuits forms the northern half of the Côte d’Or, running from the outskirts of Dijon, through seven famous communes, to the villages of Prémeaux and Corgoloin, south of Nuits-Saint-Georges.


The region is around 20 kilometres long and between 200 and 800 metres wide. It covers 3,600 hectares. Driving south from Dijon, looking to the right, you will see slopes adorned with vineyards, broken up periodically by barren, rocky outcrops and, at its southern end, limestone quarries.

The Côte de Nuits, with few exceptions, is red wine country. It is, quite simply, home to some of the greatest Pinot Noirs in the world.

Contact us to place your order: [email protected] | +852 3694 3333

 

 

Watch Guy Seddon, Buyer, sharing some insights on the 2019 vintage.

 

 

Gevrey-Chambertin

Gevrey-Chambertin is a large commune comprising 410 hectares, stretching from Brochon in the north, to Morey-Saint-Denis in the south. A mix of terroirs, with patches of limestone contributing to the complexity of the best Gevreys and to the great variety of styles. It boasts an astonishing nine grands crus, more than any other village, all bearing the name Chambertin. Gevrey-Chambertin is a red wine-only appellation.

Gevrey-Chambertin is a large commune comprising 410 hectares, stretching from Brochon in the north, to Morey-Saint-Denis in the south. A mix of terroirs, with patches of limestone contributing to the complexity of the best Gevreys and to the great variety of styles. It boasts an astonishing nine grands crus, more than any other village, all bearing the name Chambertin. Gevrey-Chambertin is a red wine-only appellation.

Corney and Barrow

Domaine des Varoilles

Domaine des Varoilles combines a number of spectacular vineyards from village to grand cru level. 

Morey-Saint-Denis

After Vougeot, Morey-Saint-Denis is the smallest village of the Côte de Nuits, with just 150 hectares of vines. Perhaps less well known than its neighbours, Gevrey-Chambertin to the north and Chambolle-Musigny to the south, it displays some of the power of Gevrey, as well as a kinship with Bonnes-Mares, which starts just beyond the southern wall of Clos de Tart. The grands crus here are Clos des Lambrays, Clos de la Roche, Clos Saint-Denis and Clos de Tart. The abundance of walled vineyards echoes the self-contained nature of this alluring but enigmatic village.

After Vougeot, Morey-Saint-Denis is the smallest village of the Côte de Nuits, with just 150 hectares of vines. Perhaps less well known than its neighbours, Gevrey-Chambertin to the north and Chambolle-Musigny to the south, it displays some of the power of Gevrey, as well as a kinship with Bonnes-Mares, which starts just beyond the southern wall of Clos de Tart. The grands crus here are Clos des Lambrays, Clos de la Roche, Clos Saint-Denis and Clos de Tart. The abundance of walled vineyards echoes the self-contained nature of this alluring but enigmatic village.

Domaine Stéphane Magnien

Located in Morey-Saint-Denis, this domaine produces village and premier cru wines in Morey and Chambolle-Musigny, as well as two grands crus, a Clos-Saint-Denis and a Charmes-Chambertin. From its 4.5ha of domaine-owned vineyards, Stephane also vinifies some Bourgogne Pinot Noir and a Passetoutgrain, with a good proportion of old clone Pinot Tordu.

VOSNE-ROMANÉE

With its six grands crus, plus the Échezeaux vineyards in the neighbouring commune of Flagey-Échezeaux, Vosne-Romanée could reasonably claim to be the apogee of the Côte de Nuits (not that it would dream of doing something so tactless). Aside from a gently salubrious air, there is little in the understated village square to give away the vinous greatness of the slopes beyond.


La Romanée-Conti is the bull’s-eye, surrounded by a cluster of famous grands crus, including La Tâche, Les Gaudichots, La Grande Rue, La Romanée, Les Richebourgs and Romanée-Saint-Vivant. To the north lies Flagey-Échezeaux and beyond it, the Clos de Vougeot.

With its six grands crus, plus the Échezeaux vineyards in the neighbouring commune of Flagey-Échezeaux, Vosne-Romanée could reasonably claim to be the apogee of the Côte de Nuits (not that it would dream of doing something so tactless). Aside from a gently salubrious air, there is little in the understated village square to give away the vinous greatness of the slopes beyond.


La Romanée-Conti is the bull’s-eye, surrounded by a cluster of famous grands crus, including La Tâche, Les Gaudichots, La Grande Rue, La Romanée, Les Richebourgs and Romanée-Saint-Vivant. To the north lies Flagey-Échezeaux and beyond it, the Clos de Vougeot.

Domaine Mongeard-Mugneret

Vincent Mongeard has run the family estate in Vosne-Romanée since 1995. The domaine’s 30ha of vineyards span the length of the Côte d’Or. The historical plots are in Vosne-Romanée and nearby, where he makes some Vosne village and premier cru, a Clos de Vougeot, some Echezeaux, Grands Echezeaux and a Richebourg.

NUITS-SAINT-GEORGES

Nuits-Saint-Georges is the most southerly of the famous Côte de Nuits appellations. As is the way in Burgundy, the town of Nuits appended the name of the best-known local vineyard, the premier cru Les Saint-Georges. Being the region’s largest urban centre, it is also the town from which the Côte de Nuits takes its name.


Nuits-Saint-Georges has extremely varied soils and aspects, comprising a substantial 300 hectares of vines, 142 of which are premiers crus. This is an appellation without grands crus, perhaps surprisingly. Known for red wines, there are in fact seven hectares dedicated to white wine production

Nuits-Saint-Georges is the most southerly of the famous Côte de Nuits appellations. As is the way in Burgundy, the town of Nuits appended the name of the best-known local vineyard, the premier cru Les Saint-Georges. Being the region’s largest urban centre, it is also the town from which the Côte de Nuits takes its name.


Nuits-Saint-Georges has extremely varied soils and aspects, comprising a substantial 300 hectares of vines, 142 of which are premiers crus. This is an appellation without grands crus, perhaps surprisingly. Known for red wines, there are in fact seven hectares dedicated to white wine production

Corney and Barrow

Domaine Gilles Jourdan

Gilles Jourdan established his eponymous domaine in 1998, having looked after the family holdings since 1970, whilst making wine at Bichot in Beaune.

 

Gilles’ chai is tiny. A central garage-like space is crammed with bottling equipment and a small tasting table, with a bottle cellar to one side and a barrel cellar to the other. Gilles has 40 pickers to call upon at harvest.

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