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Introduction

 

Located some 100 miles north of the Côte d’Or, Chablis sits apart from the rest of Burgundy, separated from the Côte d’Or by the Morvan Mountains. Geologically, it shares characteristics with the Loire and Champagne.

 

Historically, the region benefited from its proximity to Paris and being able to transport wines by river to the capital. The advent of the railways had the opposite effect as more regions, with cheaper wines, became accessible.

Chablis’ marginal location and fossil-rich soils lie at the heart of its quintessential flinty mineral style.

 

 

About Chablis

View All About Chablis

  • The origins of Chablis

    • The origins of Chablis

      Located some 100 miles north of the Côte d'Or, Chablis sits apart from the rest of Burgundy, separated from the Côte d'Or by the Morvan region. Geologically, it shares characteristics with the Loire and Champagne regions of France.

      Historically, the region benefited from its proximity to Paris and transport links via river to the capital. The advent of the railways had the opposite effect as more regions, with cheaper wines, became accessible. Chablis' marginal location and fossil-rich soils lie at the heart of its quintessential flinty mineral style.


      The history of Chablis dates back to the Roman period when vines were first planted. The Burgundy region is divided into four different areas: Côte d’Or, Beaujolais, Maconnais, and lastly, Chablis. However, the climate and soils of Chablis give the wine a unique character that is hard to find elsewhere.

  • The climate of Chablis

    • The climate of Chablis

      The Chablis region in Northern France is cool, with average temperatures ranging from 5 to 25 degrees celsius. The climate is semi-continental, defined with a low-temperature winter that gives way into a hot summer. The growing season is relatively short, with harvest typically in late September to early October.

      The climate of the Chablis region is ideal for growing Chardonnay grapes, and the result is a crisp, dry white wine that is world-renowned. The taste of Chablis is a flinty mineral style; however, the different appellations of Chablis each have their characteristics.

  • The appellations of Chablis

    • The appellations of Chablis

      The appellation system in France is a legal classification of wines produced in specific regions. First established in 1935, the appellation system protects the quality of French wines. There are four different appellations for Chablis wine:

      • Chablis Grand Cru (seven)
      • Chablis Premier Cru (fourty)
      • Chablis
      • Petit Chablis

      The appellation system is a way to classify wines based on the quality of the soils and the geographical exposure. The highest quality wine is classified as Chablis Grand Cru, followed by Chablis Premier Cru, Chablis, and Petit Chablis.

  • Food pairings with Chablis

    • Food pairings with Chablis

      Chablis is a versatile wine that pairs well with many different foods, especially delicate seafood dishes, poultry and cheeses. When choosing a food pairing for Chablis, it is essential to consider the age and characteristics of the wine, the vintage and the degree of oak influence. For pairing based on characteristics you may wish to consider:

      • Light to medium body Chablis - this lean style is an excellent pairing to light and delicate dishes
      • Chablis Grand crus best paired with richer food such as white meat or fish with creamy sauce (butter or fried).
      • Steely or mineral Chablis - perfect with raw or grilled seafood.



      When considering pairing based on vintage and oak influence, we tend to suggest the following:

      • Pair it with light seafood dishes or salads for a young unoaked Chablis.
      • Pair it with richer seafood dishes or poultry for an older unoaked Chablis.
      • Pair it with creamy pasta dishes or white meat for a young oaked Chablis.
      • For an older, oaked Chablis, pair it with roasted white meat or ages hard cheese.

      Chablis should always be served chilled, ideally at 9-12°C. The perfect food pairings for Chablis wine will vary depending on the age and type of Chablis that you are drinking. When choosing a food pairing, it is important to consider the wine's flavour profile and find a dish that will complement perfectly.

  • Oaked vs Unoaked Chablis

    • Oaked vs Unoaked Chablis

      Oak barrels can add depth and texture to Chablis. However, it's usually not chosen to alter the flavours and aromas of the wine. The synonymous buttery-like profile of Chardonnay such as brioche, caramel & vanilla is not a characteristic of Chablis. Far from it, Chablis is known for citrus zest, salinity & mineral notes, and this happens using an unoaked process.


      Typically fermented in stainless steel, Chablis retains its flinty notes and minerality to add a definitive difference to usual buttery Chardonnay characteristics. Grand Cru Chablis may use old oak barrels to give a superior complexity without changing any oak notes in the wine's aromas; however, the use of oak throughout the Chablis region is minimal.

Villages

    chablis wine

    CHABLIS

    Chablis’ marginal location and fossil-rich soils lie at the heart of its quintessential flinty mineral style.

    Domaine Vincent Dampt

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